Here are my recommendations for general soul care: 

1.  My resource page here on the blog links you to Amazon books in various categories.  It's worth visiting there just to see the little carousels twirl around, I think.  If you couldn't get to Coney Island for Labor Day, this is the next best thing.  

2.  The books I most often recommend, my favorites, are duplicated on the blog page.  When you're on the blog page, just shift your eyes over to the left to the little blue-gray Amazon box and click.  You're in.

3.  If you need help finding a counselor in your area, I recommend searching at the American Association of Christian Counselors.  You'll find four different categories of counselors:  Professional Christian Counselor, Christian Counselor, Pastoral Counselor, Biblical Counselor.  There are explanations of all those various types on the site, and I'll let you wade through that to your heart's content.  (I'm a Professional Christian Counselor, and that's the category I'd go for, because our licensing process is the most rigorous.  But check it out and make your choices.)  There's also a wonderful directory at Psychology Today.  And don't underestimate the power of a good Google search--that's how I found my spiritual director!  I Googled "spiritual director" and read profiles til I found someone who likes the same books I do.  It's a great fit.

4.  Groups are also a great way to find support and feed your soul.  Search for groups near you at Celebrate RecoveryGrief Share, or Divorce Care.  Many churches offer support groups under other names as well.  I just googled "Christian support groups" and found The National Association for Christian Recovery, for addicts and their families.  Poke around online and see what you can find.  There is help!

5.  International friends, there's an International Therapist Directory with counselors in many countries who are "familiar with the TCK and international expatriate experiences."  I'm on the list for Texas.  Which, as you know, is a country.

6.  If you're looking for counseling while staying overseas...well, that's not easy.  I do offer a limited number of Skype consultations for folks overseas.  For more information, submit the form on my Connect page.  The Oaks Counseling offers counseling to folks living overseas.  Also, check the list at #11 for all sorts of support options.

7.  Talk to someone who cares about you.  If you don't have anyone nearby, move yourself until you are in such a place.  (I have suggested several places in numbers 3, 4, 5, and 6.)  Put yourself on a plane to find this person if you need to.  Then open your mouth and speak.  (Tell the truth while you're at it.)

8.  Be open to change.  Doing the same thing over and over, expecting a different result is the classic definition of insanity.  

If you want to stop trying so dang hard all the time:

9.  Tired of Trying to Measure Up by Jeff Van Vonderen.  The subtitle is:  Getting Free from the Demands, Expectations, and Intimidation of Well-Meaning People.  I'm not sure everybody is always so well-meaning, but Jeff is clearly a nice guy.  This book helped me a whole lot.

10.  Grace for the Good Girl by Emily Freeman.  Her website is really pretty, too.

11.  Here's an excellent list of mental health resources, including a ton of apps, online support groups, and hotlines, to help in all sorts of areas.